Browse Guides

 

Verification Handbook for Disinformation and Media Manipulation

The latest edition of the Verification Handbook arrives at a critical moment. Today’s information environment is more chaotic and easier to manipulate than ever before. This book equips journalists with the knowledge to investigate social media accounts, bots, private messaging apps, information operations, deep fakes, as well as other forms of disinformation and media manipulation. The first resource of its kind, it builds on the first edition of the Verification Handbook and the Verification Handbook for Investigative Reporting.

The book is published by the European Journalism Centre and supported by Craig Newmark Philanthropies.

 

Newmark J Research Fact Checking & Verification for Reporting: Social Media Verification

Verification of content and sources:

  • Ensures the accuracy of your stories
  • Helps you avoid amplifying fabricated news & propaganda
  • Adds context, detail, history & transparency to your stories.
  • Helps you find clues & corroborating evidence to verify images, videos, and information.

 

A guide to pre-bunking: a promising way to inoculate against misinformation

Understanding how pre-bunks work (and how they don’t) is essential for reporters, fact checkers, policy-makers and platforms.

 

POYNTER: A guide to anti-misinformation actions around the world

Poynter has created a guide for existing attempts to legislate against what can broadly be referred to as online misinformation. While not every law contained here relates to misinformation specifically, they’ve all often been wrapped into that broader discussion. We have attempted to label different interventions as clearly as possible.

 

Consumer Reports: On Social Media, Only Some Lies Are Against the Rules

Your guide to every major social media company's misinformation policies on vital topics from COVID-19 to voting. Social media companies say they want to limit dangerous falsehoods while also protecting free speech. But the platforms’ rules on misinformation vary widely. And their policies are often “confusing, unclear, or contradictory,” according to Bill Fitzgerald, a privacy and technology researcher in CR’s Digital Lab.

 

Democratic National Committee (DNC) Recommendations for Combating Online Disinformation

The DNC is working with major social media companies to combat platform manipulation and train our campaigns on how best to secure their accounts and protect their brands against disinformation. While progress has been made since the 2016 elections, social media companies still have much to do to reduce the spread of disinformation and combat malicious activity. Social media companies are ultimately responsible for combating abuse and disinformation on their systems, but as an interested party, we’ve compiled this comparative policy analysis to present social media companies with additional potential solutions.

 

5 tips to identify fake news and misinformation

Altering the information spread through mass media, whether intentionally (disinformation) or unintentionally (misinformation), is not a new practice. However, misinformation and disinformation have been fuelled by digital technologies in the past decades, thanks to the rapid growth of digital media, online news outlets, and social networks. The spread of fake news online has become a major issue. Tech is catching up and new tools for identifying fake news are being developed. Besides, there are also steps you can take to identify fake news.

 

Belingcat: A Beginner's Guide to Social Media Verification

The following guide seeks to explain how we can be vigilant about the videos and photos we see online while identifying those that contain misleading, misattributed or false information. Verification doesn’t need to be difficult. It also doesn’t require any complicated algorithms or access to advanced tools or programs that automatically detect whether an image may be fake or manipulated.

 

How do you solve a problem like misinformation?

Understanding key distinctions between misinformation/disinformation, speech/action, and mistaken belief/conviction provides an opportunity to expand research and policy toward more constructive online communication.

 

News: Fake News, Misinformation & Disinformation

Sorting through the vast amount of information created and shared online is challenging even for experts. This page defines terms including and related to "fake news" while offering resources and information to avoid both reading and sharing it. The more aware you are of what false information is and how it spreads, the better you will be at avoiding it yourself - and helping your friends and family do the same.

 

Journalism, Fake News and Disinformation: Handbook for Journalism Education & Training

UNESCO works to strengthen journalism education, and this publication is the latest offering in a line of cutting-edge knowledge resources. It is part of the “Global Initiative for Excellence in Journalism Education,” which is a focus of UNESCO’s International Programme for the Development of Communication (IPDC). The initiative seeks to engage with teaching, practising and researching of journalism from a global perspective, including sharing international good practices.

Accordingly, the current handbook seeks to serve as an internationally relevant model curriculum, open to adoption or adaptation, which responds to the emerging global problem of disinformation that confronts societies in general, and journalism in particular.

 

Combating Information Manipulation: A Playbook for Elections and Beyond

Dealing with information manipulation around an election is a new and unfamiliar phenomenon for many countries. Civil society actors, journalists, governments, election management bodies and other democratic actors often end up scrambling to respond in the lead-up to an election. To address this challenge, IRI, NDI and SIO have joined forces to create this playbook, intended to help leapfrog the first six months of the electoral preparation process. The playbook lays out the basics of the problem and the core elements of a response, and points to trusted resources for those looking to do a deeper dive into a particular type of intervention or threat.

We hope this playbook will enable you and everyone dedicated to defending democracy to push back against efforts that undermine free and fair political competition. Since information manipulation is an ongoing challenge, this playbook will also be useful outside of an election cycle.

 

A Beginner's Guide to Social Media Verification

The following guide seeks to explain how we can be vigilant about the videos and photos we see online while identifying those that contain misleading, misattributed or false information. Verification doesn’t need to be difficult. It also doesn’t require any complicated algorithms or access to advanced tools or programs that automatically detect whether an image may be fake or manipulated. A critical mindset and a close look at the context of an image or post, allied with simple tools such as a Google search or reverse image platforms, are often all it takes to discover whether a piece of content is genuine. As this guide looks at some of the first steps for uncovering misinformation and disinformation, it is not fully comprehensive....A list of further resources will be included at the bottom of this article.

 

How to report misinformation online

As the world responds to the COVID-19 pandemic, we face the challenge of an overabundance of information related to the virus. Some of this information may be false and potentially harmful. Inaccurate information spreads widely and at speed, making it more difficult for the public to identify verified facts and advice from trusted sources, such as their local health authority or WHO. However, everyone can help to stop the spread. If you see content online that you believe to be false or misleading, you can report it to the hosting social media platform.